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Welcome Thread

Discussion in 'Members Lounge' started by cncguy, Nov 3, 2015.

  1. cncguy

    cncguy Administrator

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    Tell us a little about you and what you hope to share or learn.
     
  2. 3dprintforums

    3dprintforums Apprentice

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    Hello,
    I'm the previous owner of cnczone.com just stumbled upon this site figued I would join. Looking forward to posting.
     
  3. Engineer_Machinist

    Engineer_Machinist Moderator Staff Member

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    I've been a designer builder my whole life. I teach at a college have an AA Mech. Eng. and I am a Journeyman Machinist trained in a manual machine shop, ran EDM machines also. I have done quite a bit of tool and die work with precision grinders, design engineering and run a small home business running CNC mills as well as fab work welding, bending etc.
     
    3dprintforums and cncguy like this.
  4. Dave Sohlstrom

    Dave Sohlstrom Newbie

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    Hello all
    I'm a retired machinist with a home machine shop. I design and build propulsion systems for RC model boats. Some may of seen my work on the 1/32 scale model of the W. T. Preston in the scale boat section of RC Groups. I designed, built and installed the steam engines for the model that was built by Mike Jones.

    I like to sign my posts so folk know who they are talking with.

    Dave
    Ariel, WA
     
  5. 3dprintforums

    3dprintforums Apprentice

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    That is very cool I have a friend who designs and runs steam powered r/c boats.
     
  6. Engineer_Machinist

    Engineer_Machinist Moderator Staff Member

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    Dave I like the intro. Welcome.
     
  7. Joe Crumley Jr.

    Joe Crumley Jr. Newbie

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    Greeting,

    Looks like some good guys on the forum.

    I'm an older sign artists who makes only dimensional signs. When I entered this trade all my work was done by hand. That was hand lettering and sandblasting. Today I no longer compete with the sticker heads or banner folks. It's too competitive for me.

    I've owned a couple of CNC's over a twelve year period, a 4'X8' and a 5'X10' but sold them off. Now, I engage one of my former employees to help with that end of the business. It's like installations, all done by someone else, with a stronger back.

    For me, the joy in this trade is designing and concepts followed by finishing. The latter is the most time consuming and maybe the most fun. Tomorrow I'll be laying gold but next week it will be Sculpt Nouveau and texturing. What a great craft this is.

    Joe
    www.normansignco.com
     
  8. Wayne Webb

    Wayne Webb Newbie

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    I'm a sign builder by trade and a newbie to CNC building but, this spring I completed my first CNC contraption; a hotwire cutter I call the "Paragon 120D". It has 5 independent axes but, right now, the x and a, y and b are slaved together in Mach3. The z is a turntable in the center of the bed. It can cut parts from two 120" long, 120cuft blocks of EPS foam simultaneously, hence the name. I had a blast building it and can't wait to start another as time and money permit.


    This is my first job made with the hotwire. The lettering and logo were made on my 4x8 ShopBot router. I hope to build another router, in the near future, using servos to power it.
    https://scontent-ort2-1.xx.fbcdn.ne...=3546109aaefce67292160932732063ba&oe=58E4FA44
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2016
  9. Joe Crumley Jr.

    Joe Crumley Jr. Newbie

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    Wayne, Excellent post.

    As a sign maker of outdoor signs I've not found a hardcoat for foam that will last for a long time. That has always been my holdup on this product.
     
  10. Wayne Webb

    Wayne Webb Newbie

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    Really? I used a concrete-type product for this one called: Exterior Foamcoat. Next I would like to try a polyurethane topcoated with an aggregated acrylic ''synthetic stucco". I understand Peachtree has a good one called Armorcoat or something like that.
     
  11. Joe Crumley Jr.

    Joe Crumley Jr. Newbie

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    Dear Wayne,

    I think eps foam and extruded foam has are excellent for some uses. I have used it for years with individual lettering. There are several good texture coates, see the photo, that are latex based.

    Each substrate used in the sign trade has it's strength and weakness. HDU for example doesn't like screws and is down right expensive. MDO is probably the most dimensional stable but has the weakness of weathering on the edges. One of my favorite materials for dimensional signs is PVC but it too has shortcomings. I've used eps foam for several large signs but without a plural spray system, which is down right expensive and difficult to use. That's the process Peachtree uses and it's excellent. My main problem with heavy texture on signs it destroys fine detail. For that reason I use the CNC to cut lettering that's applied over the fine texture. I think the photo's will show I have used this technique. Most of my large foam signs have ended up with structural problems since eps foam doesn't do well over time. It's still a good product when it's used for lettering and logo's.
     
  12. Joe Crumley Jr.

    Joe Crumley Jr. Newbie

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